Friday, August 31, 2018

End Chair Update All Finished

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I realized today that I am terrible about sharing project end results! Back in April, I posted about our End Chair Update and then I never took pictures and let you know how it all turned out. (I blame the fact that I basically take a deep breath and then dive into the next project, such as, I am now working on updating the guest bedroom and Mr. Awesome's office (photos may or may not be shared, LOL.))

Here it is all updated:



After
The acrylic wash helps define the lines.

The finish crazed in spots, which we weren't expecting, but kind of like. 
So, as you recall, here's the before photo:
Before - KSL Classified found chair

We bought the Valspar Chalk Paint, which we custom tinted in Sweet Slumber (it turned out paler than I expected, but we were trying to stay fairly neutral in the color). It took three coats (I was hoping for two and have noticed some other people have complained about poor coverage), then we did some sanding and I did a light wash with diluted dark brown acrylic paint that I would paint on and then wipe off to give it some patina and define the lines. We then topped it with the Valspar Sealing Wax. Since then, I've noticed some crazing in the finish (see picture), but since I was going for a distressed look, I was ok with that.  

We also painted the house (with the help of an amazing friend). We stayed pale neutral because the house doesn't get a lot of sunshine, especially in the winter. In the pictures it's a subtle difference, but for us it's a lot warmer and much more pleasant. 

And now so you can see how it looks in the room (see if you can notice the wall color difference too):
Yep, the lighting is terrible.

Still terrible lighting, but you get why I needed a warm paint color.


All updated.


What do you think? Was it worth the effort?

Friday, August 17, 2018

Healthier Plum Crumble

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Here in Utah many people enjoy gardening and those of us who don't often reap the bounty of their abundant produce. (Score for us!) When one of these gardening gurus gave us a bag full of plums I wanted to make a plum crumble, but we've been eating healthier, so I wanted to give it a healthy spin. So here's what we did...



Ingredients

1 c. oatmeal
1/4 c. flax seed, ground
1/4 c. walnuts, chopped
1/4 c. peanut or almond butter
1/4 c. honey
1 t. cinnamon
pinch of salt
12 small or 6 large plums, sliced
1 T. cornstarch

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350F
  2. Grease four ramekins
  3. Mix first seven ingredients
  4. Toss sliced plums in the cornstarch and put in the bottom of the ramekins. 
  5. Top with crumble topping
  6. Bake until filling is bubbling and thickened and the topping is crisp. 
  7. Top with a dollop of greek yogurt (not included in calorie count below) and enjoy. 


P.S. It was delicious. 
P.P.S. You can make this with most fruits. 
P.P.S.S. We ate it for breakfast. LOL.

Now calorically, of course you'd be better off eating an egg-white omelette, but compared to a traditional crumble you're doing great. Also, check out the percentage of you daily fiber - 26%(!) that's over a quarter of your daily requirement in a dessert! Plus, 9.2 grams of protein in a dessert is respectable, not to mention 20% of your iron requirement, and there's plenty of heart healthy fats in here. 




Thursday, August 9, 2018

Ogden Hikes

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Mr. Awesome & I love to get into nature and go hiking and one of our favorite things about living in Utah is the plethora of trails and vistas quickly accessible along the Wasatch Front. Salt Lake City gets most of the attention, as the largest community, but those of us who live north of Salt Lake City now have a backpack-sized book to draw hiking inspiration from. 

We love shopping local, so we were really excited when we were at our favorite local bookstore and came across this Ogden Area Outings Guide from the Sierra Club, which includes descriptions, map overviews, trail ratings, and usage for around 100 trails (I'm lazy and didn't count).


There is also some guideline information included about safety, needed equipment, climate, and plant and animal life in the area, as well as information about where to get more detailed maps.

Do you have a favorite trail guide? Let us know and then get out and get hiking!